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Version: 22.3

Configuring Redpanda TLS on Kubernetes

info

See Configuring Redpanda TLS on Kubernetes for the most up-to-date instructions using the redpanda Helm chart. This page is based on the redpanda-operator Helm chart and is preserved only for backward compatibility.

This section explains how to enable Transport Layer Security (TLS) on Kubernetes using the Redpanda Operator. Alone, TLS authenticates the server and encrypts communication between the client and the server. To add client authentication, you can combine TLS encryption with SASL authentication, or you can configure mTLS authentication.

For general security information, see Redpanda Security on Kubernetes.

Prerequisites

  1. Configure the kubectl context.
  2. Install cert-manager.
  3. Install the Redpanda operator.

If you haven’t completed these tasks, follow one of the Install Redpanda guides for Kubernetes to get set up before you configure TLS. Just stop before you install and connect to the Redpanda cluster.

Step 1: Create the cluster specification file

The Redpanda GitHub repository contains a sample configuration file you can use to enable TLS.

note

To modify the sample file, save it locally and make the required changes.

The following text is the Redpanda tls.yaml file with the relevant sections highlighted:

apiVersion: redpanda.vectorized.io/v1alpha1
kind: Cluster
metadata:
name: cluster-sample-tls
spec:
image: "vectorized/redpanda"
version: "latest"
replicas: 1
resources:
requests:
cpu: 1
memory: 1.2G
limits:
cpu: 1
memory: 1.2G
configuration:
rpcServer:
port: 33145
kafkaApi:
- port: 9092
tls:
enabled: true
pandaproxyApi:
- port: 8082
tls:
enabled: true
schemaRegistry:
port: 8081
tls:
enabled: true
adminApi:
- port: 9644
tls:
enabled: true
developerMode: true

Complete these steps to configure the cluster specification file. The steps reference the highlighted lines in the file:

  1. Save the file locally to make the required changes.
  2. Configure the cluster name. The following property in the file is the name of the cluster. Change this value to the name of your cluster:
name: cluster-sample-tls
  1. Enable TLS for each API individually. You can enable TLS on one or more of the APIs. In the example, all four API have TLS enabled: Kafka API, HTTP Proxy (pandaproxyAPI), Schema Registry, and Admin API:
   kafkaApi:
- port: 9092
tls:
enabled: true
pandaproxyApi:
- port: 8082
tls:
enabled: true
schemaRegistry:
port: 8081
tls:
enabled: true
adminApi:
- port: 9644
tls:
enabled: true

Step 2: Configure external connectivity (optional)

You can specify up to two listeners for each API, but only one listener can have TLS enabled. If you do have two listeners, one must be internal, and one must be external. The exception is Schema Registry. The Schema Registry listener can be internal, or it can be an internal port that is used internally and externally. If you enable external connectivity on Schema Registry, the Kubernetes node port connects to the internal Redpanda port to provide external connectivity.

To enable external connectivity with TLS, add the following lines to each API in the configuration file that you created in Step 1:

- external:
enabled: true
subdomain: <subdomain_name>

The subdomain field lets you specify the advertised address of the external listener. The subdomain addresses, including the brokers, must be registered with a DNS provider, such as Amazon Route 53. You only need to include the subdomain name in this field, not the brokers. Each API in the configuration file must have the same subdomain specified.

The external port is generated automatically, and you don't need to specify it. In the following example, TLS is enabled on the external listener for the Kafka API. Enable external connectivity the same way for Admin API and HTTP Proxy.

kafkaApi:
- port: 9092
- external:
enabled: true
subdomain: <subdomain_name>
tls:
enabled: true

The Schema Registry syntax is slightly different, in that the ports are not a list. You can specify one internal port and one external port. Schema Registry always uses an internal port and with external connectivity configured, the Kubernetes node port connects to the internal Redpanda port. Configure TLS with external connectivity for Schema Registry like this:

schemaRegistry:
port: 8081
external:
enabled: true
subdomain: <subdomain_name>
tls:
enabled: true

For information about external connectivity, including subdomains, see External connectivity.

Step 3: Provide an issuer or certificate (optional)

Kafka API and Schema Registry let you provide a certificate issuer or certificate.

When you enable TLS, the Redpanda operator generates a root certificate for each API. However, for Kafka API and Schema registry you can instead specify a certificate issuer or a certificate.

For information about how certificates are created and used in Redpanda, see Certificates.

Provide an issuer

To provide a certificate issuer, add the issuerRef property to the cluster specification file that you created in the previous step. For information about issuers, see the cert-manager Issuer documentation.

You can provide an issuer for kafkaAPI or schemaRegistry in the same way. The example here is the kafkaAPI configuration with the issuerRef property highlighted:

kafkaApi:
- port: 9092
tls:
enabled: true
issuerRef:
name: <issuer_name>
kind: <issuer>

The issuerRef property contains the following variables:

VariableDescription
issuer_nameName of the issuer or cluster issuer.
issuerKubernetes resource that represents a certificate authority. The value of this property can be Issuer or ClusterIssuer. If the kind property is not set, or if it is set to Issuer, an issuer with the name specified in the name property that exists in the same namespace as the certificate is used.

Provide a certificate

You can provide a certificate as a secret by adding the nodeSecretRef property to the cluster specification file that you created. For information about secrets, see the Kubernetes Secrets documentation. The cert-manager Certificate documentation contains detailed information about certificates, including a diagram of the certificate lifecycle.

You can provide a certificate for kafkaAPI or schemaRegistry in the same way. The example here is the kafkaAPI configuration with the nodeSecretRef property highlighted:

kafkaApi:
- port: 9092
tls:
enabled: true
nodeSecretRef:
name: <secret_name>
namespace: <secret_namespace>

The nodeSecretRef property contains the following variables:

VariableDescription
secret_nameName of the certificate secret.
secret_namespaceKubernetes namespace where the certificate secret is. If the secret is in a different namespace than the Redpanda cluster, the operator copies it to the namespace of the Redpanda cluster.

Step 4: Create the Redpanda cluster

After you configure the cluster specification file, run kubectl apply to create the cluster. You can run the command using a path to the cluster specification file on your local machine, or you can use the URL to the sample tls.yaml file.

If you modified the file in the previous step, you have the file saved locally. To create the Redpanda cluster, run:

kubectl apply -f <cluster_specification.yaml>

If you did not modify the example file, you can use the URL to the example file in GitHub to create the cluster:

kubectl apply -f https://raw.githubusercontent.com/redpanda-data/redpanda-examples/main/docs/example-config/kubernetes/tls.yaml

Step 5: Create the ConfigMap

Create a YAML file to hold the configuration for TLS, including the location of the public certificate. In the next step, you create the Pod, which consumes this ConfigMap. This lets you run rpk commands with TLS.

For detailed information, see the Kubernetes ConfigMaps documentation.

  1. Copy the text below and save it locally as a YAML file, such as tls_config_map.yaml.
apiVersion: v1
kind: ConfigMap
metadata:
name: <ConfigMap_name>
data:
redpanda.yaml: |
redpanda:
rpk:
kafka_api:
brokers:
- <cluster_name>-0.<cluster_name>.default.svc.cluster.local:9092
tls:
truststore_file: <truststore_file_path>/ca.crt
  1. In the file that you just saved, configure these variables:

    VariableDescription
    ConfigMap_nameName of the ConfigMap. This can be any string. This is what you use to reference the ConfigMap in the next step when you configure the Pod.
    cluster_nameName of the Redpanda cluster that you defined in the cluster specification file.
    truststore_file_pathDirectory where you want to mount the ca.crt file. Generally this is /etc/tls/certs/ca.
  2. Save the file.

External connectivity

If you are configuring TLS with external connectivity, you must configure the brokers accordingly. Replace the brokers property in the example file with this:

brokers:
- 0.<subdomain_name>.:<node_port>

Configure the following variables in the brokers property:

VariableDescription
subdomain_nameName of the subdomain that you include in the cluster specification file in Step 1.
node_portKafka API external port. Unless you include this in the cluster specification file, this port is autogenerated by Kubernetes.

Step 6: Configure the Pod

The Pod is the process that consumes the ConfigMap that you created in the previous step. This Pod runs the Redpanda image in order to run rpk, which is part of the Redpanda image.

For detailed information about Pods, see the Kubernetes Pods documentation.

  1. Copy the text below and save it locally as a YAML file, such as tls_pod.yaml.
piVersion: v1
kind: Pod
metadata:
name: <pod_name>
spec:
containers:
- name: rpk
image: 'vectorized/redpanda:<redpanda-version>'
command:
- /bin/bash
- '-c'
args:
- sleep infinity
volumeMounts:
- mountPath: <truststore_file_path>
name: <ca_volume_name>
- mountPath: /etc/redpanda
name: <rpk_volume_name>
restartPolicy: Never
volumes:
- name: <ca_volume_name>
secret:
secretName: <cluster_name>-redpanda
- name: <rpk_volume_name>
configMap:
name: <configMap_name>
  1. In the file that you just saved, configure these variables:

    VariableDescription
    pod_nameName of the Pod. This is the Pod that runs rpk. This can be any string.
    argsSpecifies what you want the Pod to do. You can run rpk commands here. This example uses the sleep infinity argument, which tells the Pod to keep running so that you can run as many rpk commands as you want from the command line.
  2. Configure the volumeMounts properties. There are two: one for ca, and one for rpk.

    • ca - The path and the name of the ca.crt volume mount.

      VariableDescription
      truststore_file_pathThe same path that you specified in the truststore_file_path property in the ConfigMap. Generally this is /etc/tls/certs/ca.
      ca_volume_nameThis can be any string, but it must be the same as ca_volume_name in the volume property of this file.
    • rpk - The path and the name of the rpk volume mount.

      VariableDescription
      rpk_volume_nameThis can be any string, but it must be the same as rpk_volume_name in the volume property of this file.
  3. Configure the volume properties. There are two: one for ca, and one for rpk.

    • ca - The name and secret of the ca.crt volume mount.

      VariableDescription
      ca_volume_nameThis must be the same as the ca_volume_name in the volumeMounts property of this file.
      cluster_nameCluster name that you defined in the cluster specification file in Step 1. The secretName property specifies the name of the node secret. For the Kafka API, this is <cluster_name>-redpanda.
    • rpk - Volume name and ConfigMap name of the rpk volume mount.

      VariableDescription
      rpk_volume_nameThis must match the <rpk_volume_name> in the volumeMounts property of this file.
      configMap_nameConfigMap name that you specified in the name property of the ConfigMap in the previous step.
  4. Configure the <redpanda-version> variable. Add a Redpanda version, such as v21.11.11. You can find all the Redpanda version tags in the Redpanda Docker Hub repository.

  5. Save the file.

Step 7: Create the Pod

To create the pod, run:

kubectl apply -f <tls_pod.yaml>

Step 8: Connect to Redpanda

Now that you have TLS enabled and the Pod created, you can start using rpk to interact with Redpanda. Note that each time you run an rpk command, rpk establishes a connection and authenticates the server.

  1. To create a topic, run:
kubectl exec <pod_name> -- rpk topic create <topic_name>

Configure these variables:

VariableDescription
pod_nameName of the Pod that you specified in the Pod configuration file.
topic_nameName of the topic that you're creating with this command.
  1. To describe the topic, run:
kubectl exec <pod_name> -- rpk topic describe <topic_name>
note

You don't need to specify the brokers in these commands, because they were defined in the ConfigMap. If you include brokers in the rpk commands, it overrides the brokers in the ConfigMap.

Step 9: Clean up

You can use rpk commands to start producing and consuming to your cluster.

When you're ready to delete your cluster and configuration files, run:

kubectl delete -f <cluster_specification.yaml> -f <tls_config_map.yaml> -f <tls_pod.yaml>

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